Homeothermic Blanket Systems with Flexible Probe

Homeothermic Blanket Systems with Flexible Probe

Feedback loop warming system that allows for the animal's temperature to be maintained.  Each system is supplied complete with control unit, flexible temperature probe, blanket, and plastic cover for the blanket.

  • Animal body temperature control at its simplest — feedback loop maintains animal’s temperature 
  • Versatile, offered in three sizes – for mice, rats, cats, dogs or similar sized animals 
  • New lightweight package 
  • Improved electronic circuitry 
  • Suitable with high gain recording equipment 
  • Displays actual body temperature on Control Unit from 20° to 50°C (68° to 122°F) 

See Full Description for additional information.

 

 

Item# Description U.S. List Price Quantity
507225F Complete Homeothermic Blanket System with Flexible Probe, Large, 230 VAC, 50 Hz
507223F Complete Homeothermic Blanket System with Flexible Probe, Medium, 230 VAC, 50 Hz
507221F Complete Homeothermic Blanket System with Flexible Probe, Small, 230 VAC, 50 Hz
507224F Complete Homeothermic Blanket System with Flexible Probe, Large, 115 VAC, 60 Hz
507222F Complete Homeothermic Blanket System with Flexible Probe, Medium, 115 VAC, 60 Hz
507220F Complete Homeothermic Blanket System with Flexible Probe, Small, 115 VAC, 60 Hz
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Simple and Easy
Wrap the animal tightly in the heating blanket, using tape if necessary. Insert the temperature-sensing probe rectally, and set the required temperature by means of the control on the front panel.

Should the animal’s core temperature fall, power is automatically increased to the blanket; conversely, power will automatically reduce if the animal’s temperature rises. During this process the animal’s temperature is continuously displayed on a front panel LCD display.

This homeothermic blanket system consists of three parts: a probe, a control unit, and a blanket. The flexible probe is a precision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tube. The 1.7 mm diameter probe is 100 mm (4 in) long and has a 2 m (6 ft) long cable with plug for attachment to the control unit. It is suitable for a wide range of laboratory animals from mice to large dogs.

The output of the temperature sensing probe is used by the control unit to proportionally control the regulated, low-voltage DC supply to the blanket. This method of control alleviates the interference problems associated with that of non-proportional control, such as switching contacts, thus enabling the system to be used in conjunction with high-gain recording systems.

The control temperature is preset at 37°C (98.6°F) at the factory, but can be adjusted within the range of 20° to 50°C (68° to 122°F) by means of a control on the front panel. An LCD display on the control unit continuously displays the probe temperature. A horizontal LED bar graph indicates the level of power being delivered to the blanket. When core temperature is substantially below the desired temperature the bar graph will indicate maximum power being delivered.

The blanket consists of a highly flexible insulated heating element, which can be folded without risking internal damage. It is electrically floating, with respect to ground however, one end of the heating element can be grounded by a switch on the front panel of the control unit. The system operates satisfactorily whether or not the blanket is grounded. Special circuitry eliminates electrical noise thus permitting sensitive recordings.

Blankets are available in three sizes:

  • Small Blanket: Measures 15 x 20 cm (6 x 8 in) and is suitable for rodents
  • Medium Blanket: Measures 45 x 70 cm (18 x 27 in) and is suitable for rabbits and cats
  • Large Blanket: Measures 60 x 90 cm (24 x 36 in) and is suitable for dogs

The blanket is supplied with a 2 m (6 ft) cable attached to a plug for connection to the control unit. This system enables the researcher to maintain an animal’s temperature within the preset range of 20° to 50°C (68° to 122°F). Each system is supplied complete with control unit, temperature probe, blanket and plastic cover for blanket.

Specifications507225F507223F507221F507224F507222F507220F
Blanket Length English2418624186
Blanket Length Metric604515604515
Blanket Width English3627836278
Blanket Width Metric907020907020
Cable Length English666666
Cable Length Metric222222
Power Hz505050606060
Power VAC230230230115115115
Probe ConfigurationFlexibleFlexibleFlexibleFlexibleFlexibleFlexible
Probe Diameter Metric1.7 mm1.7 mm1.7 mm1.7 mm1.7 mm1.7 mm
Probe Length English444444
Probe Length Metric100100100100100100
Probe MaterialPrecision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tubePrecision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tubePrecision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tubePrecision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tubePrecision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tubePrecision thermistor encapsulated in a bead of epoxy resin at the top of a flexible hollow plastic tube
SizeLargeMediumSmallLargeMediumSmall
Temperature Range English68 to 122 68 to 122 68 to 122 68 to 122 68 to 122 68 to 122
Temperature Range Metric20 to 50 20 to 50 20 to 5020 to 50 20 to 50 20 to 50
Rapid Onset of Specific Diaphragm Weakness in a Healthy Murine Model of Ventilator-induced Diaphragmatic Dysfunction Segolene Mrozek, M.D., M.Sc.,* Boris Jung, M.D., Ph.D.,† Basil J. Petrof, M.D.,‡ Marion Pauly, M.Sc.,§ Stephanie Roberge, M.Sc.,§ Alain Lacampagne, Ph.D., Ce´ cile Cassan, Ph.D.,# Jerome Thireau, Ph.D.,** Nicolas Molinari, Ph.D.,†† Emmanuel Futier, M.D., M.Sc.,‡‡ Valerie Scheuermann, M.S.,§§ Jean Michel Constantin, M.D., Ph.D., Stefan Matecki, M.D., Ph.D.,## Samir Jaber, M.D., Ph.D.*** Background: Controlled mechanical ventilation is associated with ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction, which impedes weaning from mechanical ventilation. To design future clinical trials in humans, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms using knockout models, which exist only in the mouse, is needed. The aims of this study were to ascertain the feasibility of developing a murine model of ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction and to determine whether atrophy, sarcolemmal injury, and the main proteolysis systems are activated under these conditions. Methods: Healthy adult male C57/BL6 mice were assigned to three groups: (1) mechanical ventilation with end-expiratory positive pressure of 2– 4 cm H2O for 6 h (n 6), (2) spontaneous breathing with continuous positive airway pressure of 2– 4 cm H2O for 6 h (n 6), and (3) controls with no specific intervention (n 6). Airway pressure and hemodynamic parameters were monitored. Upon euthanasia, arterial blood gases and isometric contractile properties of the diaphragm and extensor digitorum longus were evaluated. Histology and immunoblotting for the main proteolysis pathways were performed. Results: Hemodynamic parameters and arterial blood gases were comparable between groups and within normal physiologic ranges. Diaphragmatic but not extensor digitorum longus force production declined in the mechanical ventilation group (maximal force decreased by approximately 40%) compared with the control and continuous positive airway pressure groups. No histologic difference was found between groups. In opposition with the calpains, caspase 3 was activated in the mechanical ventilation group. Conclusion: Controlled mechanical ventilation for 6 h in the mouse is associated with significant diaphragmatic but not limb muscle weakness without atrophy or sarcolemmal injury and activates proteolysis.